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Data Fluencies: 2017

Data Fluencies 2017

Data Fluencies exist for two main group: consumers of data (so, everyone, basically) and creators of data (researchers and administrators, mostly). These groups have a lot in common and each does best if they understand the needs of the other. Consumers and creators of data should consider:

  • How data can be shared
  • How data and related files are organized
  • How data can be reused
  • How to interpret and visualize data
  • How data is documented - with readme files, codebooks, and/or metadata
  • How to backup, store, preserve, and archive data
  • Ethical issues associated with data

Workshops

Don't Lose Your Data: Storage & Backup for Your Data
Learn about storage and backup best practices and why preservation and archiving might also be useful in ensuring access to your data for the long term. You'll leave knowing better habits for backing up and storing your data and understanding the differences between backup, storage, preservation, and archiving.

Documenting Your Data for Your Future
Learn how ReadMe files, code books, data dictionaries can help you make sense of your data in the future and how more formal metadata can be beneficial as well. You'll leave being able to decide which documentation practices exist, and which will work best for you, to describe your data better, and work more knowledgeably with metadata.

Keeping It All Together: File Management for Research
Learn about file naming and organization best practices and sustainable file types. You'll leave knowing best practices for naming and organizing files in ways that work for you.

Other People's Data: What Even Is This?
Learn about reusing and interpreting other people's data. You'll leave knowing how to look for an employ data documentation and do some basic data cleaning for reuse.

Data Visualization Best Practices
Learn about some basic things to keep in mind when creating visualizations of your data. You'll leave knowing how to make your visualizations accessible and more understandable.

DATA BREACH - Ethical Considerations When Working with Data
Hear some classic data horror stories about personally identifying information being shared and other unethical practices for data researchers. Learn how to avoid making the same mistakes.


Related Workshops

DMP Basics
Data management plans (DMPs) are becoming common requirements when applying for funding. This session will teach you what DMPs are asking of you, why they're more than a burdensome requirement, and how to follow the plan you create.


Request a Workshop

Request one of the above workshops or a tailored workshop for your class/research group by emailing Margaret at mjanz@upenn.edu

Workshop Schedule

Consultations

Our workshops can give you great advice for thinking about working with and organizing your and other people's data. Many important aspects of data use require a more personalized touch. Contact Margaret Janz or your subject specialist to set up a more focused workshop or a consultation about:

  • Depositing data in a repository
  • Filing naming and organization
  • Metadata and documentation
  • Backup and storage options
  • other!

Scholarly Communication & Data Curation Librarian

Margaret Janz's picture
Margaret Janz
Contact:
Van Pelt 131
215-898-4836