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The Art of Research Workshop Series: Workshop Archives

Truth in Research: Assessing Credibility in Scholarship and Beyond

What does it mean for information to be trustworthy? We are presented with unfamiliar arguments daily, in informal and in scholarly contexts. In those moments, we must make quick judgments about whom and how much to trust. This session will give participants strategies for evaluating information, whether it comes from a blog post or an academic journal article.

Scholarship as Conversation

How do you start out with a topic you like or an interesting idea, and turn it into research?  What do you need to know to participate in scholarly conversations? Scholarship is a system in place for valuable academic research and scholarship. Experts use specialized journals to share the findings, and university libraries pay for, organize, and make this information available to researchers. This session will demonstrate how to find quality sources with hands-on examples, and to identify and contextualize quality research—what does it mean for something to be a “seminal work”? Participants will also deconstruct and discuss how the academic world evaluates and ranks published work.

Patchwriting and Contextomy: Your Ideas or Theirs?

The perfect supporting source can do wonders for your paper’s credibility, but finding a source is only half the battle.  To use your sources effectively and ethically, you need to show a clear separation between your own work and theirs.  You know you need quotation marks if you use someone’s exact phrasing, but when is writing different enough to say it’s your own?  When is it TOO different to say it’s someone else’s?  In this session, participants will learn about patchwriting and contextomy, two common pitfalls of using sources.  Join us to find out what they are, why they’re a problem, and how to avoid them.  

Art of Research 001: Intro to Research

Research is an art, and, at the same time, it is also a process. Organize your research and your writing. Break out your tasks in a manageable way. Recognize and use different kinds of citations.

This session will cover research basics, including strategies you can use, from starting with an idea and research question all the way to a finished research paper. Come join us for an introduction to research!

Art of Research 002: Search, Fact-Check, Repeat

Do you sometimes feel like you are Googling for something that is just "good enough"? Learn some secrets that will have you searching with purpose using the right tools, and not just Google.

Biased news reporting, clickbait, social media, online ads: the number of questionable content and claims out there can be staggering. There's a way to identify the questionable: fact-checking.

What is legitimate to cite in your research, and what’s not? How do you recognize quality information and ultimately decide which sources to use?

Sometimes there is too much information, and it can be hard to determine what’s the most reputable. This session will identify strategies you can use to search and locate trusted, reliable sources.

Art of Research 003: Keep Track of Your Research

What’s the best way to keep track of the articles and sources you find?  

Come hear about how researchers can get organized, and which software, apps, or tools you can choose to save time when you are ready to sit down to write. This session will explore tools to organize your research: RefWorks, Zotero, or a basic system using Excel or spreadsheets.

Art of Research 004: What You Should Know About Publishing

Do you want to publish your research? Have you ever wondered how academic authors get published?

Scholarly journal articles are part of a larger academic publishing system. Experts use journals to share research, and libraries buy, organize, and give access to journals and other information.

This session will explore the idea of “seminal work,” and how researchers get published. Participants will take a look at scholarly publishing and identify ways that researchers evaluate and rank each other’s work.

Art of Research 005: Research in the Moment: Refining Your Work

How do you use sources, while you're sitting down at your computer, writing your research at the same time?

All researchers cite sources to give credit to other researchers for their ideas. Join us to hear about problems that plague researchers while they write.

This session will explore what you can do to give credit where credit is due, and make your research stand out as original work!

Inside the Black Box: Relevance Ranking and "Smart" Searching

We’ve all seen it: the “Sort by: Relevance” option. But what does it actually mean to sort by relevance? How does a website come to suggest recommendations or related works? Join us for a conversation on the orchestration of search results using machine learning. 

“The Black Box” is a STEM metaphor for systems in which one sees inputs and outputs, but not the inner workings. In many ways, the modern research process is one such “Black Box.” In this special series of The Art of Research, we examine the hidden computational processes behind common research tools and techniques. We focus on, to the degree possible, the algorithms and AI principles underlying relevance ranking, automated evaluation, and even publishing practices.  

Inside the Black Box: Plagiarism Detection

Software like TurnItIn, iThenticate, and Plagiarism Checker allow instructors to upload student papers and, with the click of a button, determine whether or not students have outright copied from another source. What happens in between the upload and the output designation? How do these tools, used by the academic and publishing industries alike, compare papers in progress to innumerable potential sources, and what makes the difference between inspiration and plagiarism? Join us for a conversation on the inner workings of plagiarism detection. 

“The Black Box” is a STEM metaphor for systems in which one sees inputs and outputs, but not the inner workings. In many ways, the modern research process is one such “Black Box.” In this special series of The Art of Research, we examine the hidden computational processes behind common research tools and techniques. We focus on, to the degree possible, the algorithms and AI principles underlying relevance ranking, automated evaluation, and even publishing practices.  

Inside the Black Box: Influence and Impact Designations

Web of Science designates them: “Hot Papers”; PubMed calls them “Trending Articles”. Increasingly, websites and databases are relying on automation to pinpoint influential works. What factors go into determining a work’s influence and impact, and how are those factors weighed differently in human decision-making versus a machine-driven algorithm? Join us for a lively discussion about automated designation of popularity and influence. 

“The Black Box” is a STEM metaphor for systems in which one sees inputs and outputs, but not the inner workings. In many ways, the modern research process is one such “Black Box.” In this special series of The Art of Research, we examine the hidden computational processes behind common research tools and techniques. We focus on, to the degree possible, the algorithms and AI principles underlying relevance ranking, automated evaluation, and even publishing practices.  

Inside the Black Box: Automated Credibility Evaluation

When it comes to evaluating credibility, people are notoriously biased. But can artificial intelligence reliably pinpoint suspicious, misleading, or false speech online? In this session, we’ll discuss the techniques companies like Facebook and Google are using to combat fake and misleading content, as well as the ramifications of those techniques. 

“The Black Box” is a STEM metaphor for systems in which one sees inputs and outputs, but not the inner workings. In many ways, the modern research process is one such “Black Box.” In this special series of The Art of Research, we examine the hidden computational processes behind common research tools and techniques. We focus on, to the degree possible, the algorithms and AI principles underlying relevance ranking, automated evaluation, and even publishing practices.