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Critical Writing Program: Fakes & Forgeries in Archaeology, WRIT 013-305 Spring 2020: Overview

How to Read a Citation

For more information, see the MLA Style Guidelines (easier to use: Purdue's Online Writing Lab). What you will typically see in Works Cited (that is, the bibliographies) are formatted as follows:

Books

Author(s) name(s). Title of Book. Publisher, Publication Date.

If a single author or the first of several authors, the name will appear Last Name, First Name. Additional authors will follow after a comma or "and" as First Name Last Name.

Librarian's tip! In library catalogs, search the authors' names or the Title of the Book. Do not include the first definite article ("The" or an equivalent) in the title.

Book chapters or specific essay in an anthology:

Author(s) name(s). "Title of Chapter/Essay." Title of Book/Collection, Publisher, Year, Page range of entry.

If the author(s) of the section are different than the editor(s) of the whole volume, then "edited by Editor's Name(s) " is inserted between the Title of the Book/Collection and the Publisher.

If a single author or the first of several authors, the name will appear Last Name, First Name. Additional authors will follow after a comma or "and" as First Name Last Name.

Librarian's tip! In library catalogs, search the editor/authors' names or the Title of the whole book. Do not include the first definite article ("The" or an equivalent) in the title.

Journal articles:

Author(s) names. "Title of Article." Title of Journal, Volume, Issue, Year, pages.

If a single author or the first of several authors, the name will appear Last Name, First Name. Additional authors will follow after a comma or "and" as First Name Last Name.

Librarian's tip! In library catalogs, search the Title of Journal, NOT the article title. Once you find the record for the journal, look at the information provided together with the library location to see which volumes and/or years are held.

 

Where to Find Books and Journals

The Franklin Library catalog will help you find the call number and the library in which the book or print journal is located, as well as links to e-books, e-journals, and other online resources.

  • Search for a specific book by its title, author, or ISBN.
  • For journal articles, search the Journal Title.
  • You can also do a keyword or subject keyword search to find materials on a particular topic.

If Franklin indicates that it is available, then you can go to the holding library and see it yourself, use Request button to ask for its delivery to another Penn library location for your convenience, or use Scan and Deliver to request a chapter or article be scanned and delivered to you via e-mail. You must be logged into www.library.upenn.edu with your PennKey to see these request options.

If Franklin indicates that what you want is Not on Shelf or if you cannot find it in Franklin, then do not forget the wonders of Penn's speedy Interlibrary Loan!

Other important resources for finding books:

How to Find Articles Online

If you have a complete article citation, try searching the Title of the Article (framed in quotation marks) in Articles+ to find the full text of your article.

No luck? That doesn't mean we don't have access to the article - it could be in print, for example! Try using the PennText Article Finder as a next step. This will very likely give you a pop-up box with options to access the article online, in print, or through interlibrary loan.

Don't hesitate to contact library staff if you are having trouble. NEVER PAY FOR ACCESS TO AN ARTICLE ONLINE!

How to Find Articles in News and Popular Media

Check out this guide for news and media for International Relations students.

See also The New York Times' topical page for Archaeology and Anthropology.

Generic scholarly databases

These databases will help you find scholarly articles (full-text and citations) about most research topics:

Subject specific databases

For more information about research in archaeology, start with the basic guide being prepared by Deb Stewart.

Background Resources

Librarian

Deb Stewart's picture
Deb Stewart
Contact:
Deb Brown Stewart
Head, Museum Library
University of Pennsylvania Museum of Anthropology and Archaeology
3260 South Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
215 898-4021

Chat

Keyword Searching

This document suggests a good method of crafting effective keyword searches:

PowerNotes

PowerNotes is software that helps you gather and organize research.

Have questions about PowerNotes? Tips, troubleshooting, and tutorials are here: https://www.blog.powernotes.com/help

Still need help? You can use the PowerNotes contact form, or you can contact the Penn Libraries -- be sure to include "PowerNotes" in your question, so it is routed to the correct librarian.

Deb's in-class example

Scholarly understanding of prehistoric marble figurines, dating from 3200-2000 B.C.E. and from the Cyclades islands (eastern Mediterranean),  has been complicated both by looters destroying archaeological sites and forgers creating fakes for a hungry art and antiquities market. The majority of "Cycladic figures" or "figurines," especially in museums, have no known archaeological context.

The large, so-called "Keros Hoard" of Cycladic figurine fragments has been the subject of debate and study for the last 50 years. The grouping, allegedly from the island of Keros, was sold on the art market in the middle of the 20th century to the Erlenmeyer family in Basel, Switzerland. In 1990, their private collection, including the "hoard," was sold in the UK and dispersed to museums and private collections around the world, after the Greek government failed to prove its case that the hoard was looted from a specific archaeological site. In the 1960s, 1980s, and more recently, archaeologists have attempted to identify from which site(s) and contexts (ritual? grave? ancient houses?) the fragments may have come from.  Meanwhile, scientific research continues to look for ways to separate authentic Cycladic figurines from modern forgeries.

Example we started with:

Renfrew, Colin. “Keros and the development of the project.” The Sanctuary on Keros and the Origins of Aegean Ritual Practice: the Excavations of 2006-2008, vol. 1, edited by Colin Renfrew, et al., McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, 2013, pp. 3-18.