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Omeka: Overview

A Guide to Omeka, a web publishing platform for web content management and exhibits.

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Learn more

The choice of whether to use Omeka can be complex and depends on your course goals, learning objectives, and other factors.  To learn more about Omeka email us or contact your librarian.

Beyond Omeka!

Not sure if Omeka will work for your project? Consider Scalar, a web publishing platform designed for authoring digital books. Learn more here.

How Can I Use Omeka?

Build a Digital Exhibit

  • Omeka is built around the concept of creating online collections of digitized materials and curating them for the web. Plugins like Exhibit Builder make  it simple to organize your collection into an attractive and interactive narrative.
  • Enhance a physical exhibit! - A common use case for Omeka is to build a digital exhibit to accompany a physical exhibit. This allows interested patrons or visitors to explore topics in more depth, even after the physical exhibit is no longer on display.

Collaborate to Tell a Story

  • Collaboration, whether its amongst students in a course at Penn or a research team around the globe, is easy with Omeka! Omeka site owners can add users with varying levels of access and designated roles. 
  • An alternative to a final paper! - Past courses at Penn have used the creation of an Omeka exhibit as an multimedia-enhanced, interactive alterative to a final paper.
  • Instructors: Create an interactive digital assignment! - Encourage your students to learn to work together as a class or small groups to build a digital exhibit, narrative, or map! Library staff offer in-course sessions to prepare students for this project, and weekly office hours to help students throughout the semester.

Create a Mapped Narrative

Crowdsource your Research

  • With the Scripto plugin, you can invite the world to help you gather data about your research... for free! Using this plugin requires significant configuration, so please contact the Omeka Team to get you started!
  • Invite the community to contribute to your project with the Contribution plugin.
  • Encourage guests to leave comments about your work with the Commenting plugin.

Create a Mobile Tour

  • Curatescape allows you to create a series of mobile optimized tours! Using this series of plugins and themes requires significant configuration, so please contact the Omeka Team to get you started!

Embed Interactive Storytelling Elements

Subject Guide

Katherine Ahnberg's picture
Katherine Ahnberg
Contact:
Van Pelt-Dietrich Library
3420 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104

Technical Support

Sasha Renninger's picture
Sasha Renninger
Contact:
Museum Library
Penn Museum
3260 South Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
215-898-9331
Website

Penn Omeka Projects Showcase

American Literary Radicals - A Course Project

American Literary Radicals - An Omeka Course Project

Many types of literature appeared radical in the 19th century in the United States:  some texts were politically extreme, some stylistically innovative and others violated literary standards of taste.  Many texts did all three.  This project investigates the connection between innovations in style and content as well as messages that demanded social change.

April Fooled! - An Omeka Pop-Up Exhibit Companion

April Fooled! - An Omeka Pop-Up Exhibit Companion

April Fooled aims to remind students and the public that, while audio, image, and video manipulation is reaching new heights, the phenomenon is not a new one. It also aims to empower viewers by introducing them to tools to identify manipulated images before sharing them.

This site is a companion to a pop-up poster exhibit at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries, held in April 2018, and curated by Katherine Ahnberg, Patty Guardiola, Samantha Kirk, and Kenny Whitebloom. 

Explore Fisher - A Library Omeka Project

Explore Fisher - A Library Omeka Project

This is your guide to the history of the Fisher Fine Arts Library at the University of Pennsylvania. Previously known as the Furness Building (after its architect, Frank Furness) and the University Library, the building is now offically called the Anne and Jerome Fisher Fine Arts Library, after the main donors to the building's restoration project in the 1980's.

Penn Libraries Holy Land Digital Image Collections

Penn Libraries Holy Land Digital Image Collections

Thanks to a major gift from Edward Lenkin (C'71, PAR'12), the Penn Libraries acquired in 2009 an outstanding collection of historical photographs of the Holy Land. The Lenkin Family Collection of Photography at the Penn Libraries, as it is now known, comprises over 5,000 original photographs, primarily of Jerusalem and Palestine taken from 1850 to 1937. These photographs serve as primary source materials for teaching and research across a broad spectrum of disciplines, including the history of photography, architecture, regional planning, religious studies, history, and political science.

Anatolian Travelers - A Neatline Course Project

Anatolian Travelers - A Neatline Course Project

The Anatolian Travelers Project aims to map pre-20th century CE travel accounts about western Anatolia (modern Turkey).  We hope to better understand human movement through this landscape prior to the advent of modern transportation technologies.

This site was built as part of a Penn Classics course. Students used Neatline, Neatline Text, and Simile Timeline to embed the text of travel narratives on interactive maps and timelines.

Archive for Ornamental Bodies - A Neatline Course Project

Archive for Ornamental Bodies - A Neatline Course Project

The Archive for Ornamental Bodies is an experiment in the documentation and description of bodies — natural bodies, human bodies, metaphysical bodies, linguistic bodies. The AOB collects bodies of all materials and forms. It is our particular mission, however, to gather bodies characterized by some extravagance or inessentiality, and to confer plentitude on their excess through the medium of language.

This exhibit was curated by the students of a Penn English Department Course.

Centennial Exhibition - A Neatline Library Project

Centennial Exhibition - A Neatline Library Project

This project grew out of an inventory of the Centennial collection in the Perkins Rare Book Room at the Fisher Fine Arts library.  and What We Saw and How We Saw It, the book selected for the basis of this project. The text is a tour guide written for visitors to Memorial Hall, the art gallery of the Centennial. The way the text is written, visitors are guided from gallery to gallery, and are told about the different paintings and artists on exhibit. By recreating the gallery space virtually, we can move through Memorial Hall as visitors in 1876 would have done, experiencing the space and the paintings in the same context. Due to time contraints, only the American section has been covered. But, it is hoped that this project will be continued, so that the full gallery tour will be available.

The Wanamaker Bronze Collection - An Omeka Dissertation Supplement

The Wanamaker Bronze Collection - An Omeka Research Paper Supplement

Welcome to the website for the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology’s Wanamaker Bronze Collection. This collection is made up of 454 bronze reproductions of objects primarily from Pompeii and Herculaneum, ranging from small tools to life-size statues and furniture. John Wanamaker (1838–1922), the Philadelphia department store magnate and longtime member of the Museum’s Board of Managers, purchased these bronzes from J. Chiurazzi & Fils for the museum in 1904. Due to their status as reproductions, only a handful of these bronzes are on display. They are presented here in a more complete fashion. On this website, you will find information about the collection’s history; background on the Pompeiian house and the archaeological contexts of the originals; the Wanamaker Bronzes categorized by object type; featured groups of bronzes; bibliography; and contact information, including forms to request objects for class use or individual research.

Schuylkill River and Urban Waters Research Corps Archive - An Omeka Community Archive

Schuylkill River and Urban Waters Research Corps Archive - An Omeka Community Archive

The Schuylkill Corps Archive is an interactive and growing public archive of citizen science and public humanities projects. Together we will discover and document the tidal river's past and present while collaboratively imagining it's future. 

DataRefuge Stories - An Omeka Community Project

DataRefuge Stories - An Omeka Community Project

Data Refuge launched November 2016 in Philadelphia to draw attention to how climate denial endangers federal environmental data. With the help of thousands of civic partners and volunteers, the project has rapidly spread to over fifty cities and towns across the country. Now, Data Refuge is building a storybank to document how data lives in the world – and how it connects people, places, and non-human species. Learn more at datarefuge.org

SAST 208 Doing Research - An Omeka Course Project

SAST 208 Doing Research - An Omeka Course Project

This course combines student research into Penn's manuscript collection with digital exhibit building.

Spanish Language at the Penn Museum - A Penn Museum Omeka Project

Spanish Language at the Penn Museum - A Penn Museum Omeka Project

This site offers a toolkit of teaching aids that Spanish language instructors at Penn can utilize to incorporate Object-Based Learning in to their curriculum.

The Japanese Archaeological Collection at the University of Pennsylvania - An Omeka Course Project

The Japanese Archaeological Collection at the University of Pennsylvania - An Omeka Course Project

This class integrates the Japanese archaeological artifacts (188 items) and drawings (16 sheets) that were given to the Penn Museum at the World’s Columbian Exposition of1893 as a gift from the Tokyo National Museum/Meiji Government. It is clear from the collection that the Tokyo National Museum, supported by the Meiji Government, carefully chose representative artifacts collected from all over Japan that would show the world a high level of sophistication in Japanese prehistoric materials. These items are composed primarily of intact pots representing the Japanese prehistoric periods, large ceramic sherds bearing elaborate surface decorations, elaborately manufactured stone tools, large drawings of major archaeological artifacts and sites in Japan, and rich ceremonial and ritual paraphernalia.

City Plans - A Penn Libraries Architectural Omeka Archive

City Plans - A Penn Libraries Architectural Omeka Archive

The Omeka project contains an archive of Philadelphia City Plans.

War and Conquest in Medieval Europe - An Omeka Course Project

War and Conquest in Medieval Europe - An Omeka Course Project

War was not only a series of actions, but it also permeated society in a very concrete way through physical objects and material texts. These objects and texts inscribed war in everyday settings and, beyond that, they also reaffirmed both the importance and glory of war. This exhibit examines the remains of the physical life of war. In other words, what were the aesthetics of medieval warfare? What made war appealing and/or beautiful? "The Aesthetics of Medieval Warfare" will treat aesthetics in a large way, not only in terms of beauty but in terms of physical expression more largely.

Here and Over There - An Omeka Course Project

Here and Over There - An Omeka Course Project

This website was created as a project of a curatorial seminar at the University of Pennsylvania in the Fall of 2014. The aim of this project is to explore the historic engagement of the University of Pennsylvania and its faculty, students, and graduates in the Near and Middle East. It does so while drawing in part on objects and materials in the Penn Museum and across Penn’s campus. This site showcases just a sampling of the interesting objects – and stories – that help to tell the narrative of Penn’s engagement in the Middle East.

Art at Penn - An Omeka Course Project

Art at Penn - An Omeka Course Project

Through this website five students within the Fall 2015 course on Digital Art History (under the guidance of Professor Christopher Pastore) attempt to create an easy-to-use online art collection. Each student selected five artworks encompassing a spectrum of mediums, sizes, and locations throughout the University of Pennsylvania's existing art collection.

Haudenosaunee Timeline - An Omeka Course Project

Haudenosaunee Timeline - An Omeka Course Project

Because the Creation Story of the Haudenosaunee has been passed on to generations by oral tradition, the story is different for every retelling. This version of the origin story is based on that of Chief Gibson.

Who Was Alfred Dreyfus? - A Library Special Collections Project

Who Was Alfred Dreyfus? - A Library Special Collections Project

The materials on display here are facsimiles of originals in the Lorraine Beitler Collection of the Dreyfus Affair at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries. This exhibition begins with a timeline and cast of characters and then gives a semi-chronological overview of the Dreyfus Affair, focusing on specific themes and individuals central to the Affair. It also examines the Affair from larger perspectives, exploring topics including the role of the military; images and graphics; social media and popular culture; women; the press and public opinion; and patriotism. Justice, truth, and loyalty: all were put to the test during the Dreyfus Affair, and its lessons will resonate with today’s audiences.

Penn Museum Archives Foreign Language Toolkit - A Penn Museum Omeka Project

Penn Museum Archives Foreign Language Toolkit - A Penn Museum Omeka Project

The Penn Museum Archives Foreign Language Toolkit is an ongoing project of the Penn Museum Academic Engagement Department and the Penn Museum Archives. We welcome you to browse these documents and images, which represent only a small fraction of the foreign language materials available for research and study in the Penn Museum Archives. 

The Preface Project - A Library Special Collections Project

The Prefact Project - A Library Special Collections Project

The Preface Project is a multi-modal digital archive exploring the relationships among truth claims, direct address of the reader, and authorial voice in the prefaces of 1760s novels. The archive conceives of prefaces as products of and catalysts for relationality, while weaving together new layers of enmeshment, through curated cataloging and audio, visual, and textual digital reproductions.  Through the proliferation and linking of metadata, through the multimedia presentation of the prefaces, and through the open-access publication of the archived materials, the Preface Project generates new networks, entangling them with the conversations and relations of 1760s prefaces.

Sara Yorke Stevenson - A Library Omeka Project

Sara Yorke Stevenson - A Penn Library Omeka Project

A collection of works about and by Sara Yorke Stevenson.