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Child Welfare: Home

Child Welfare resources include notable books, databases and indexes of journals, as well as background resources (e.g. reference works) such as encyclopedias and published bibliographies. Please also consider consulting the main Social Policy and Practice guide for more resources.

Background Information: Overviews of Research

Reference Works

Databases

Subject Guide

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Sam Kirk
she/they
Contact:
Van Pelt Library
Room 211

Locating Books and Journals in Child Welfare

Search Franklin, the library catalog, for books and journals related to child welfare. Books and entire journals (e.g. the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines) are tagged with Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) for easier discovery. For example, the journal Children, Youth and Environments contains these tags:

  • Amusements
  • Children
  • Children and the environment
  • Teenagers
  • Teenagers and the environment

A search in Franklin for Teenagers AND Environment, limited to Journal/Periodical, would include Children, Youth and Environments in the results because of these tags.

Here's another example. Interested in newly added books on child development? Try a Franklin Advanced search. Enter subject heading keyword search for "child development" OR "Adolescent psychology" OR "Child psychology" OR "Infant psychology", limited to publication date 2020-2023. Use the Franklin limiters to limit the format to Book. Sort the results from newest to oldest. Your results will look something like this.

example of subject heading keyword search related to child development, limited by format and date, sorted by date

 

 

Sometimes subject headings will include terms that are no longer used regularly in popular discourse, like the phrase "Problem children." The Library of Congress does regularly update subject headings, but sometimes this can take awhile. For now, using a deprecated term like this may increase the number of relevant results for older works when searching for related content (e.g. content related to at-risk youth).

Curious about other potential subject headings in child welfare? See the attached document for ideas.