Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Citation Practices and Avoiding Plagiarism: Examples of Quotation

Quoting

When you use the words of another person, you must quote them. This has two key parts: 1. quotation marks around the words that are quoted, 2. a citation to the text you draw the quote from. 

Quoting from a Source

 

Original

"In these contexts, schools become sites of fear rather than sites of engagement, reflecting the limitations rather than the potential of students."

from Gadsden, Vivian L. “Gender, Race, Class, and the Politics of Schooling in the Inner City.” The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 673, no. 1 (September 2017): 12–31. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002716217723614.

 

Plagiarism - Direct Quotation

When schools shift their focus from education to discipline, they become sites of fear rather than sites of engagement (Gadsden 18).

This quote doesn't use quotation marks, even though it cites the source.

 
Not Plagiarism - Direct Quotation

When schools shift their focus from education to discipline, they "become sites of fear rather than site of engagement" (Gadsden 18).

 
Plagiarism - Unique Terms or Specific Language

When schools become disciplinary sites of fear rather than places where students feel nurtured or excited about learning, those students are less likely to perform well. 

This quote doesn't use quotations marks. Even though it is only three words, it is clearly a turn of phrase that is Gadsden's and carries her ideas. 

 
Not Plagiarism - Unique Terms or Specific Language

When schools become disciplinary "sites of fear" rather than places where students feel nurtured or excited about learning, those students are less likely to perform well (Gadsden 18). 

Quoting Quotations in Sources

Original text

Moving beyond an anticorporate focus, the CFS movement recognizes community gardens as "commons ... that expand and deepen cultural and ecological vision and mold citizenship" (DeLind 2002, 222).

from Baker, Lauren E. "Tending cultural landscapes and food citizenship in Toronto's community gardens." The Geographical Review, vol. 94, no. 3, 2004, p. 305-325.

Plagiarism

Community gardens are more than spaces to grow food. They are also spaces "that expand and deepen cultural and ecological vision and mold citizenship" (DeLind 2002, 222).

This quote is plagiarism because it presents the article author's research as the writer's own research. The best scholarly practice would be to read the DeLind article, choose your own selection from it for your analysis, and then cite DeLind. Otherwise you need to cite that it is quoted in the Baker article.

Not Plagiarism

Community gardens are more than spaces to grow food. As Laura DeLind says, they also "expand and deepen cultural and ecological vision and mold citizenship" (qtd. in Baker, 309).