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Museum Library Events and Workshops: Home

2018-2019 Student Fieldwork Photograph Exhibit

Penn in the Field: Student Fieldwork Photography, 2013-2018 showcases fieldwork and research travel of current undergraduate and graduate students through their own lenses. This year's contributors include students from Penn's Department of Anthropology, Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World graduate group, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, and East Asian Languages and Civilizations.

The exhibit will remain on display on the Museum Library’s first and second levels until August 2019. 

("Cats of Arslantepe" Malatya, Turkey (2018) by Katherine Burge, Ph.D. candidate, AAMW)

Fall 2019 Workshops

Watch this space for announcements (by late September)

Spring 2019 Workshops for Penn students, faculty, and staff

Hack your Bibliography with Zotero!

January 18, 2-3PM, Museum Library

Zotero is a free tool that allows you to collect, organize, cite, and share your research sources as you find them. Zotero identifies a variety of item types, including books, articles, maps, images, videos, and more! Collect with a click in your browser, and your items will be synced across devices and ready for you to organize with collections, tags, and notes. Create your bibliography directly within Microsoft Word with your chosen citation style. Collaborate with colleagues and distribute bibliographies through shared collections.  Registration: http://libcal.library.upenn.edu/event/4903006

 

[Dig]ital Discoveries: Emerging Tech in Archaeology and Anthropology, I

February 1, 3-4PM, Museum Library

Please join us for a conversation with Anthropology PhD Candidate Li Li, whose research focuses on Paleolithic technology and human evolution. Li Li will discuss her fieldwork at the Shuidonggou Site in Northwest China and her use of Agisoft to build a 3D model of the site.

Read more about her research in this recent Penn Museum blog post, which was also featured in Penn Today!

Seating limited, so please register here.

 

[Dig]ital Discoveries: Emerging Tech in Archaeology and Anthropology, II

February 8, 3-4PM, Museum Library

Please join us for a conversation with AAMW PhD Candidate Emily French, whose research engages Roman conceptions of space through landscape/geographic floor mosaics. Emily will share about her fieldwork in Cosa, Italy and her use of 3D modeling to both document trenches and resituate mosaic floors in their original interior contexts

Seating limited, so please register here.

 

Writing Anthropological and Archaeological Content for Public Audience

February 25, 11AM-12 noon, Museum Library

Panelists Jane Hickman (editor of Expedition magazine), Anne Tiballi (Mellon Director of Academic Engagement), Alexandra Kralick (PhD candidate, Penn Anthropology), and Marah Blake (Museum Library Programming and Instruction Intern and MFA Creative Writing candidate) will share their experiences seeking, editing, and writing content that is appropriate for non-expert audiences.  

Organized by the Museum Library and the Penn Museum Graduate Advisory Council

Seating limited so please register here.

 

[Dig]ital Discoveries: Emerging Tech in Archaeology and Anthropology, III

March 15, 3-4PM, Museum Library

Please join us for a conversation with SAS senior Malkia Okech, who is majoring in Near Eastern Languages and Civilization. Malkia's coursework has included a range of technologies, including 3D modeling and scanning, drone piloting, spatial analysis, and more. Her current research on her senior thesis entails reconstructing the tomb of Osiris at Abydos, Egypt.  She will discuss her fieldwork in the Vayots-Dzor region of Armenia and how she created a VR experience of the reconstructed medieval fort site. Learn more about the full scope of this project on Malkia's blog, Archaeological Experiments with Virtual Reality

Seating limited so please register here.

 

[Dig]ital Discoveries: Emerging Tech in Archaeology and Anthropology, IV

March 22, 3-4PM, Museum Library

Please join us for a conversation with Professor Peter Decherney, Professor of Cinema & Media Studies and English. Professor Decherney has directed documentary and virtual reality films includingFilmmaking for Democracy in Myanmar, Glimpses of Kalobeyei about a refugee settlement in Kenya, and The Heart of Puerto Rico about artists in Puerto Rico after hurricane Maria. He will discuss his work with ethnographic filmmaking with a 360 camera. 

Seating limited, so please register here.

 

I Finished My Dissertation. Now What?

April 12, 2-4PM, Museum Library

You're writing or have finished your dissertation...what's next? Should you embargo? Put it on ProQuest? Should you formally register for copyright? Should you use a Creative Commons license? What about the future? Are you planning on publishing based on your dissertation? This workshop will cover these issues and more, discussing your scholarship now and in the future.

You will learn about your rights as an author and how to protect them, things to take into consideration as you prepare for subsequent publication, and general tips and tricks for publishing and sharing your work. There will be ample time for Q&A., so bring your questions! 

Registration: http://libcal.library.upenn.edu/event/5037230

 

 

Fall 2018 Workshops for Penn students, faculty, and staff

Things Every Student Should Know About Copyright and Publishing

September 14, 3:00–4:00, Museum Library

No matter where you are in the publishing process - whether you are just beginning to think about publishing or already have several publications out - you likely have outstanding questions about copyright and publishing. Can I use this image in my work? What can I do with my work once it's published? What does that agreement I signed actually say? Can I post my work on a certain website?

Join Sarah Wipperman, Penn Libraries' Scholarly Communications Librarian, to learn practical advice about reusing works responsibly, making your work more visible, and retaining more of your rights as an author when you publish.

Register here

 

Hack Your Bibliography with Zotero!

September 21, 3:00-4:00, Museum Library

Zotero is a free tool that allows you to collect, organize, cite, and share your research sources as you find them. Zotero identifies a variety of item types, including books, articles, maps, images, videos, and more! Collect with a click in your browser, and your items will be synced across devices and ready for you to organize with collections, tags, and notes. Create your bibliography directly within Microsoft Word with your chosen citation style. Collaborate with colleagues and distribute bibliographies through shared collections.

Please bring a laptop! Signing up for and installing Zotero before this session will maximize our time to engage this tool more fully.

Register here

 

Introduction to the Penn Museum Archives and the Basics of Archival Research

October 19, 3:00-4:00, Museum Library

The session will begin with an introductory tour of the rich Penn Museum Archives with archivist Alex Pezzati. Participants will learn about tools to discover unique collections and about best practices for researchers who use archives.

NOTE: Please meet at the Penn Museum’s Kress Entrance (side entrance) for tour

Register here

 

Data Visualization Made Easy

November 2, 2:00-4:00, Museum Library

Digital Humanities Specialist, Sasha Renninger, will discuss some basic concepts and tools for data visualization. Attendees will explore RAWGraphs, a D3-powered, free and open source toolkit built for "making the visual representation of complex data easy for everyone." Walk through the process of taking your data from an Excel spreadsheet to an interactive web-ready visualization.

Register here

 

Understanding Image Permissions

November 9, 3:00-4:30, Museum Library

In this session aimed at students and early-career authors in particular, Hannah Bennett, Director of the Fisher Fine Arts and Museum Libraries, will share her expertise in finding images, understanding image rights, and seeking permissions to use in dissertations and publications.

Register here

 

Exploring Cultural Diversity through eHRAF World Cultures (Human Relations Area Files)

November 16, 3-4, Museum Library

With 800,000+ pages about more than 400 cultures worldwide, the online collections known as eHRAF World Cultures and eHRAF Archaeology are important tools for cross-cultural research in the social sciences. Workshop participants will learn to navigate the complex HRAF index and construct effective searches in the online database, eHRAF World Culture, with Head of the Museum Library Deb Stewart.

Bring your laptop and research topics!

Register here

2019-2020 schedule of "Off the Shelf" pop-up events

Schedule being revised and will be announced shortly! 

2018-2019 "Off the Shelf" Schedule

Description de l'Egypte (1809-1828)

September 28, 3-4PM, Museum Library

More than 160 savants accompanied the Napoleonic military expedition to Egypt, which launched in 1798. Even following Napoleon's return to France, many of the scholars remained behind to document antiquities, modern settlements, topography, waterways, flora, and fauna. Their studies and illustrations were compiled in more than 20 volumes, Description de l'Egypte, ou, Recueil des observations et des recherches qui ont été faites en Égypte pendant l'expédition de l'armée française (1809-1828). This beautifully illustrated publication had enormous influence on European and American interests in ancient and modern Egypt.

Please join Ph.D. candidate in NELC, Paul Verhelst, and Head of the Museum Library, Deb Stewart, in the Museum Library from 3-4PM on Friday, 9/28 to discuss the Napoleonic expedition to Egypt and this extraordinary publication. During this one-hour "pop-up exhibit," several volumes will be on display, and library staff will be available to turn the pages for viewing by Penn students, faculty, and staff as well as visitors to the Museum.

 

British and French Excavations in the Near East, 1842-1867 with Dr. Richard Zettler, Associate Curator-in-Charge of Penn Museum’s Near East Section, and Dr. Grant Frame, Associate Curator in the Babylonian Section.

October 26, 3-4PM, Museum Library

French diplomat, Paul-Émile Botta, and British adventurer, Colonel Austen Henry Layard, excavated at Khorsabad, Nimrud, and Nineveh in the 1840s and 1850s. Although they were not the first European antiquarians to conduct research in Mesopotamia, beautifully illustrated publications about their discoveries and adventures excited European and American audiences and were important catalysts to Assyriology. Their large-scale projects inspired further explorations and research, including the first American archaeological expedition in the Middle East, which was undertaken by the University of Pennsylvania at the site of Nippur and led to the founding of what is now the Penn Museum.

Join NELC faculty members and Associate Curators at the Penn Museum, Richard Zettler and Grant Frame, along with Head of the Museum Library, Deb Stewart, to view and discuss books by Botta, Layard, and their contemporaries from the Museum Library's Locked collections.

 

South Asian Religions through Colonial Eyes with Dr. Jef Pierce, South Asian Studies Librarian

November 30, 3-4PM, Museum Library

South Asia has long been branded a spiritual land in the colonialist imagination; whether marveling at unfamiliar beliefs or deriding “heathen” practices, literature of the period frequently sensationalizes the region’s religious cultures. Travelogues such as those of Reginald Heber and Louis Rousselet emphasize hook-swinging, “suttee,” and Kālī-worshiping Ṭhugs. Social analyses such as those of Alexander Duff and John Welsh Dulles fixate on caste and lavish deity worship. Artists, too, are enchanted with religious imagery, with Emily Eden portraying the princely perspective, John Griffiths depicting premodern Buddhist cave-temples, and Tyra Kleen deftly capturing the movement of Hindu temple dancers in Bali. In browsing through these works, we’ll consider how sets of common tropes come to define South Asian religious life for colonial consumption.  

 

Collecting China with Dr. Adam Smith, Assistant Curator in Penn Museum’s Asian Section and Assistant Professor in EALC

January 25, 3-4PM, Museum Library

Please join Dr. Adam Smith, Assistant Curator in Penn Museum’s Asian Section and Assistant Professor in EALC, to view and discuss a selection of 19th-20th-century books from the Museum Library on East Asian history, art, and artifacts during this one-hour pop-up exhibit. In particular, catalogs from the library’s special collections yield insights into the formative years of the Penn Museum’s Asian Section.

 

“In a very short time everything is full of worms” Padre Francisco Eder among the Baure of the Bolivian Amazon

with Dr. Clark Erickson, Curator of Penn Museum's American section and Professor of Anthropology

February 22, 3-4PM, Museum Library

Dr. Clark Erickson will discuss Padre Francisco Javier Eder (1727-1773) and his impact on the study of the Bolivian Amazon. Eder’s Descriptio provinciae Moxitarum in regno Peruano (1791) and its translations will be on view, as well as maps and selected works of archaeologist and anthropologist Erland Nordenskiold (1877-1932).

 

Why is the Museum Lopsided? The History of the Museum Building through Archival Documents, Photographs, and Drawings

with Senior Archivist, Alessandro Pezzati, and Assistant Archivist, Eric Schnittke

March 29, 3-4PM, Museum Library

On Friday, please join Penn Museum Archivists Alessandro Pezzati and Eric Schnittke as they present the history of the Penn Museum building.  Archival highlights include documents, photographs, and drawings from the founding of the Museum in 1887 up to the 1980s.

 

Judging a Book by Its Cover with Head of the Museum Library, Deb Stewart

April 26, 3-4PM, Museum Library

Many 19th and early 20th-century books have mechanically produced spines and covers that are decorated with vignettes or exotic motifs created through the use of blind stamps, gold leaf, and color application. These publisher’s bindings often reflect the contents of the book but are sometimes influenced by greater design movements.

The Museum Library’s special and general collections include a number of 19th and 20th-century explorers’ memoirs with such decorated bindings. You are invited to join Head of the Museum Library, Deb Stewart, to learn about the explorers and admire the decorative bindings that accompany their stories during this pop-up exhibit, 3-4PM, Friday afternoon on the first floor of the Museum Library.

 

A Race to Publication: Athenian Monuments in the 18th Century with Samantha Tory Breecher, Ph.D. candidate in Penn Classics, and Head of the Museum Library, Deb Stewart

May 31, 3-4PM, Museum Library

In the middle of the 18th century, favorable diplomatic relations between Britain and the Ottoman Empire allowed two English architects, James Stuart and Nicholas Revett, to travel to Greece. They completed their survey of Athenian architectural monuments by 1753, but did not publish the first volume of their proposed three-volume folio until 1762. The French architect Julien-David Le Roy, after learning about their proposal and trip, hastened to Greece himself in 1755. He quickly published Les Ruines des plus Beaux Monuments de la Grèce by 1758, and an unauthorized English version, Ruins of Athens: with remains and other valuable antiquities in Greece, was published by Robert Sayer in 1759. For this Off the Shelf event, we will take a look inside some of these works and explore their aesthetic differences while delving deeper into the rivalry sparked between Stuart and Le Roy. 

 

 

 

The Museum Library

The Museum Library, located in the Academic Wing of the Penn Museum, is the University of Pennsylvania's branch library for anthropology and archaeology. With over 145,000 volumes on-site with historic strengths in biological and physical anthropology, cultural anthropology, archaeology worldwide, and Native American studies, it is one of the premier branch libraries for anthropology in the United States.

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Librarian

Deb Stewart's picture
Deb Stewart
Contact:
Deb Brown Stewart
Head, Museum Library
University of Pennsylvania Museum of Anthropology and Archaeology
3260 South Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
215 898-4021