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One Health Study

Penn Veterinary Medicine Librarian

Margy Lindem's picture
Margy Lindem
Contact:
Hill Pavilion
380 S. University Ave.,
Philadelphia, PA 19104
Website

Search steps

  1. Define your research question or questions
  2. Determine key concepts and identify search terms and operators (iterative)
    • subject headings and textwords - use as building blocks in your search
    • operators and limiters, phrase, truncation and wildcards
    • field searching
  3. Choose sources
    • multidisciplinary databases for scoping searches
    • research databases
    • grey literature and statistics
  4. Review and manage results
    • save search strategies 
    • save relevant citations
    • find full text
    • share and annotate
    • keep a simple search journal noting databases you've searched, scoping search for cutting and pasting, etc.
    • keep a concept table - grid of synonymous text words and subject headings for each concept in your research question

 

Moving from a known article

building a search from a known article


  • Author keywords may be available.  Most specialty databases (PubMed, CAB Abstracts, PsycINFO, etc.) will have subject heading thesauri
  • Use GoogleScholar, Scopus and Web of Science to find citing articles
  • Similar Articles/Related Articles can be based on subject headings or, in databases without subject headings like Scopus and Web of Science, based on co-citation.  See article in PubMed
  • Use Scopus and Web of Science to review references for articles (and download them), even if the full text is not available
  • Look at Acknowledgments in the article or the Grants Sponsor field to see who funded the research, and may have funded similar projects